TWINKLEYELL


1,668 notes

I Wanna Be Your Lover by Prince
1,499 notes

(Source: the-loon, via eastafriqueen)

831 notes

(Source: coyotenegro, via sluttygaybrother)

35,285 notes "Depression is stupid and not a thing that makes me a better writer. One time I went a whole year without writing and I stayed in bed and drank. Fuck your Bukowskisms. I want sunlight and love and running down some street I’ve never been on where it’s warm and cool at the same time and I’m smiling. I want nothing to ever be bad again- and I don’t mean that I want a life free of conflict, I mean that I want a life free of meaningless conflict. Not being able to will oneself to take a shower or leave the house is meaningless. There is nothing to be gained, no lesson to be learned from that kind of life. My heart is stale, my prose is stale. Give me fire if you want to hurt me. Give me something I can taste. There’s nothing romantic or mysterious about where I am. There’s nothing here worth holding onto." — By Joshua Espinoza  (via quibbler)

(Source: doubtsbestally, via ethiopienne)

24,669 notes

lovefeedsme:

truth.

(Source: stankonia, via soul-rebel-impel)

21,102 notes

esachicaa:

samkidanuengirl:

charlottesharks:

Barbapapa, photographer Isabelle Chapuis 

this is fuckin brilliant

I luh dis

(via ethiopienne)

31 notes

Do You Think About Us? (So So Def Remix) by Total
450,491 notes

grrrlfever:

my life became 600% better when i started acting like a self obsessed piece of shit like 10/10 would recommend

even if u don’t actually genuinely love yourself its fuckin fun to act like you think you’re the human embodiment of perfection go on try it life’s too short to not fall in love with yourself

(Source: lesbolution, via yagazieemezi)

3,023 notes

babygirlcryfest:

i-am-ramona-flowers

(Source: tteonajimara, via moonemoji)

967 notes

Laurent Elie Badessi traveled to Niger, Africa in 1987 and 1988 to photograph indigenous tribes for his Master’s Degree thesis project entitled “Ethnological Fashion Photography”. His goal was to study the impact of photography on natives from different ethnical groups, some of who had never (or very rarely) been exposed to this medium. The psychological aspect in the interaction that occurs between a photographer and his sitter during a photo session was also a focal point in his research.

For this undertaking, Badessi adopted the method of “La photographie négociée” (the Negotiated Photography), introduced to him by his teacher photographer Michel Séméniako. Badessi was seduced by this method and decided to use it here, because it allows the sitter to determine most of the parameters for a photo session that captures his/her image. In this case: the pose, the clothes, the make-up, the accessories, the time of day and the location. To make these sittings playful, he decided to use an element specific to human kind—clothing—as the main source of interaction between him and the autochthones.

For his research to be pertinent, Badessi decided to stay extended periods of time with each different ethnicity to better appreciate their culture. He and his team lived with the following ethnicities all across the country: the Haoussas, the Bororo (Wodaabe), the Kanouris, the Gourmances, the Djemmas, the Beri Beris and the Touareg.

The experience with the Bororo happened to be one of the greatest highlights of the project. Because they worship beauty, this highly nomadic group was particularly drawn to the “magic” and playfulness of having their photo taken.

Photography was totally foreign to this group of Bororo. To familiarize them with the medium, Badessi started taking Polaroid of his teammates, so they could see and understand its process. Little by little they became more comfortable with the team and expressed an increasing curiosity towards the “magic box” known to us as the camera. This particular group of about 100 nomads had only seen their image as a reflection of themselves into the water or in the mirror. When Badessi took their photo on Polaroid, he had to explain what to look for on the image–their face, their hat, their accessories, et cetera. Appearing so small wasn’t rational to them. It was total magic, because they were used to see their reflection as a life-size image, but not as a “tiny person” on a small piece a paper! Once they were able to recognize themselves, they laughed and placed the Polaroid over their heart. It was very emotional to see how touched they were and how precious the Polaroid became to them.

The photo sessions were a success and they became an integral part of the Bororo’s daily routine. After the cores, they could not wait to get ready for the sittings.

As Badessi mentions in his thesis, “we were in symbiosis with them, as much as they were with us. They were excited to have visitors and to share these great moments together. It was very inspirational to look at them getting ready. Somehow it was a meditative experience for us, because they took their time, you did not feel the constant pressure of the clock ticking in the back of your head, like we do in our culture, especially in big megalopolises. They totally lived in harmony with Mother Nature and respected her rhythm.” (Keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(Source: yagazieemezi, via yagazieemezi)

406 notes

angel-cine:

Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995)

12,863 notes

leseanthomas:

NYC in the 1980s.

Love.

Memories.


After picking up a camera at the age of 15, Jamel Shabazz has been unknowingly become the first “visual documentarian” of hip hop. For over 30 years he’s captured the world around him. Every frame  of that world is a time portal that sparks emotion stemming from the scenes they represent. And if there is ever a glimpse into the foundations of street wear and its surrounding culture, it can be found in the pages of his first book.

“Back In The Days” is real deal documentation as it pertains to the origins of hip hop, not to mention hip hop fashion. No 2oK a day models. No makeup artists. No food trucks. The models in the book don’t need runways because they lived the life of style. Jamel Shabazz was there to capture it all.”

Purchase here: http://www.jamelshabazz.com/monographs.html

(via cocoabutterboy)

452 notes

avecsabombe:

Sontag, An Argument about Beauty

(via goldacrylicnails)

8,222 notes foxxxynegrodamus:

WOW THIS IS SO IDEAL

foxxxynegrodamus:

WOW THIS IS SO IDEAL

(Source: therealpuppyish)

15,818 notes

Selena Quintanilla Perez

(Source: lastgoodbye3, via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)